Could life be different for my children?

You have a high education, but you worry about the future prospects of your children in your current society.

Many highly educated EU citizens from Southern and Eastern Europe feel that the development is going in the wrong direction in their respective home countries. They are frustrated with the current state of affairs, and they do not believe that things are going to change for the better. Such worries are felt even more acutely by families with children: It is one thing to feel dissatisfied with the current realities of your own life, but another thing entirely to have to face the prospect of raising children in an insecure society that you feel has no hope of improvement.sol-988514_640

One such EU citizen, a Greek psychiatrist, told us that before the financial crisis hit Greece there were 15 children in one school class, while today that figure has doubled – leaving much less time and space for each child to develop. Another doctor, a Hungarian general practitioner, spoke of how hard it would be for her as a single mother to be able to finance her child’s higher education because of low salary levels. A Croatian psychiatrist explained how her parents after a long working life were currently unable to survive on their pensions and relied on financial help from family members. She wanted to avoid such a future fate for herself and not least for her own children. Similar unstable and unsustainable conditions in society led a Bulgarian surgeon to conclude that he needed to move his family from Bulgaria to a country with better outlooks. This was because in order to uphold a reasonable living standard for his family and secure his children’s future in Bulgaria he had to work around the clock, meaning that he was never really able to spend quality time with his wife and children at all.

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There is another way. The future can be different.

All of the EU doctors in the examples mentioned above have found a way to change not only the current lives of themselves and their families, but as a result also the future prospects of their children. In essence, these doctors have managed to leave the undesirable circumstances in their home countries behind by settling in Denmark with their families to work and live there.

brothers-457237_1280The Greek psychiatrist has arrived with her husband and two children in a country where the average number of pupils in each class in Danish public schools is around 20. As for the Hungarian general practitioner, her daughter can look forward to receiving free higher education subsidised by the Danish state now that they have been able to start their life afresh in Denmark. Furthermore, salary levels for medical specialists in Denmark are so that the Croatian psychiatrist will not need to worry about the future of neither herself or her children: Not only will she be able to help care for her parents, she will also be in a position to significantly save up. Finally, the Bulgarian surgeon now benefits from a Danish work week of 37 hours. As a result, he is able to spend much more time with his family.

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How to make the future better.

The EU doctors in the cases above have all found permanent employment in Denmark via the recruitment services of Medicolink. At Medicolink we strive to offer you a quality in service throughout the entire recruitment process. We know full well that a decision to move to another country is not to be taken lightly. That is why we offer our full commitment not only to you as a candidate but to your family as well. Please do not hesitate to contact us to learn more about what we offer.

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